TVCC Catalog

Course Index - N

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  • NATR: Natural Resources

    Intro To Wildland Fire (Fft2)

    • NATR 101 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter, Spring

    Includes S-130, S-190, and L-180 training. Provides entry level firefighter skills, including the primary factors affecting the start and spread of wildfires, and recognition of potentially hazardous situations. Meets the fire behavior training needs of a firefighter type 2 (FFT2) on an incident as outlined in the PMS 310-1.

    L-280 Followership To Leadership

    • NATR 102 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Offers a self-assessment opportunity for individuals preparing to step into a leadership role. Combines one day of classroom instruction followed by a second day in the field, working through a series of problem solving events. Prerequisites: NATR 101

    Applied Botany

    • NATR 103 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Introduces plant identification. Familiarizes students with basic field characteristics necessary for identifying forest and range plants. Includes terminology, morphology, nomenclature and classification with basic techniques for using plant keys. Introduces ecological concepts and plant relationships. Lab required.

    S-290 Intermediate Fire Behavior

    • NATR 104 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Prepares the prospective supervisor to undertake safe and effective fire management operations. Develops fire behavior prediction knowledge and skills. Discusses fire environment differences. Prerequisites: NATR 101.

    Field Methods In Natural Resources

    • NATR 105 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    This course serves as an introduction to field work in Natural Resources. Classes will be held largely outside using a variety of field measurement tools and methods used commonly by natural resource professionals in subdisciplines of water resources, wildlife, forestry, cartgraphy, range management, surveying, and other related fields. Lab required

    Intro To Fire Effects

    • NATR 106 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Introduces the physical and biological effects of fire on ecosystems. Includes effects on individual plants and animals, range sites, timbered areas, air quality, watersheds, soil, and other related resources. Lab required.

    S-260 Interagency Incident Bus Mgt

    • NATR 107 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Offered as needed

    Provides general training needs for all positions requiring an understanding of interagency incident business management. Prerequisites: NATR 101.

    S-270 Basic Air Operations

    • NATR 108 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Offered as needed

    Discusses aircraft types and capabilities, aviation management and safety for flying and working with agency aircraft, tactical and logistical uses of aircraft, and requirements for helicopter take-off and landing areas. Prerequisites: NATR 101.

    S-200 Initial Attack Ic

    • NATR 109 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    This course will provide the individual in charge of the initial attack of small non-complex fires, the training needed for size-up, deployment of forces, suppression, mopup, communications, and administrative duties. Prerequisites: NATR101, NATR 104.

    Intro To Natural Resources

    • NATR 111 (P/T)
    • 5.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    The term "Natural Resources" covers a variety of topics and disciplines. This course serves as an introduction to the broad diverse field of natural resources. Each week students will research and study various disciplines within Natural Resources. Much time will be focused on current issues in various fields. Field labs to regional natural resource sites as well as guest lectures will be held weekly. Lab required

    Global Positioning Systems (Gps)

    • NATR 112 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Spring

    Acquaints the student with global positioning systems or GPS. Includes what GPS is, its uses, its short-comings, and field experience in the use of the equipment. Lab required. Some sections may have a no-cost text book option.

    S-230 Crew Boss-Single Resource

    • NATR 115 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Produces student proficiency in the performance of duties associated with the single resource boss position from initial dispatch through demobilization to the home unit. Includes operational leadership, preparation and mobilization, assignment preparation, risk management, entrapment avoidance, safety and tactics, offline duties, demobilization, and post incident responsibilities. Prerequisites: NATR 101, NATR 102, NATR 104. Recommended prerequisite: NATR 121.

    S-215 Fire Operation Wildland/Urban

    • NATR 116 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Assists structure and wildland firefighters in making tactical decisions when confronting wildland fire that threatens life, property, and improvements, in the wildland/urban interface. Includes size-up, initial strategy, structure triangle, tactics, action assessment, public relations, and followup and safety.

    S-231 Engine Boss-Single Resource

    • NATR 117 (P/T)
    • 1.00 Credit

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Produces student proficiency in the performance of the duties associated with engine boss, single resource, including engine and crew capabilities and limitations, information sources, fire size-up consideration, tactics, and wildland/urban interface. Prerequisites: NATR 101, NATR 104, NATR 115.

    S-131 Squad Boss

    • NATR 121 (P/T)
    • 1.00 Credit

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter, Spring

    Meets the advanced training needs of the Firefighter Type I (FFT1) in an interactive format. Contains several tactical decision games designed to facilitate learning the objectives. Prerequisites: NATR 101 and one year experience in the field.

    S-390 Wildland Fire Behavior Calc

    • NATR 122 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Introduces fire behavior calculations by manual methods, using nomograms and the Fire Behavior Handbook Appendix B. Examines the determinants of fire behavior through studying inputs (weather, slope, fuels, and fuel moisture). Instructs how to interpret fire behavior outputs, documentation processes, and fire behavior briefing components. Prerequisites: NATR 101, NATR 104, NATR 115.

    S-330 Task Force/Strike Team

    • NATR 123 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Provides training for the positions of Task Force Leader and Strike Team Leader specific to wildland fire suppression, as outlined in the Wildland Fire Qualification System Guide and the Position Task Books. Prerequisites: NATR 101, NATR 104, NATR 122.

    S-336 Tactical Decision Making

    • NATR 127 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Offered as needed

    Provides training requirements for the Operations Section of the Incident Command System. Prerequisites: NATR 101, NATR 104, NATR 115.

    Map Use and Analysis

    • NATR 140 (P/T)
    • 4.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Introduces the development, understanding, and practical use of planimetric and topographic maps, along with aerial photographs. Includes map scale, finding distances, directions, and area on maps and photos, and identification of map and photos features. Also introduces application of GPS and GIS in Natural Resource Management. Lab required

    Environment and Society

    • NATR 201 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Provides an overview of the complex political, social and economic issues met when managing Natural Resources of the Pacific Northwest. The course exposes students to local, regional and global environmental issues faced by a growing society. Topics will include climate change, habitat loss, sustainability, environmental justice, and global population growth. The course develops critical thinking skills useful in seeking out complex resource management solutions for a dynamic society.

    S-212 Wildland Fire Chain Saws

    • NATR 202 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Introduces the function, maintenance and use of internal combustion engine powered chain saws, and their tactical wildland fire application. Provides entry level training for firefighters with little or no previous experience in operating a chain saw. Does not constitute certified faller designation. Prerequisites: Qualified FFT2, and current first aid/cpr certification.

    S-211 Portable Pumps and Water Use

    • NATR 203 (P/T)
    • 2.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Consists of three skill areas: supply, delivery and application of water. Requires set up, operation, and maintenance of pump equipment in a field exercise.

    Intro To Watershed Management

    • NATR 217 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Surveys the theory, principles and practices involved before water is utilized for commercial production projects. Studies the microclimate, hydrology, and soil as influenced by the vegetation in relation to the regional variables of climate, geology, topography, and vegetation type and structure. Follows the water from the atmosphere, to the ground, and down the watershed to the area where it can be used for natural resources, industry, recreation, and domestic needs. Lab required.

    Intro To Natural Resource Ecology

    • NATR 221 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Introduces ecology, including evolution, adaptation, plant and animal distributions, terminology, ecological relationships and interactions individual ecosystems, and global ecological principles. Stresses the ecology of the northwest.

    Intro To Range Management

    • NATR 241 (P/T)
    • 4.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Introduces the science of range management, including identification, physiology, and ecology of range plants; stocking rate considerations; grazing system selection; range improvement methods; range inventory methods and analysis; and nutrition. Emphasizes range management objectives to provide society with meat, water, wildlife, and recreational opportunities on a sustained basis from lands unsuited for permanent cultivation. Lab required.

    Outdoor Recreation Management

    • NATR 251 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Outdoor Recreation Management explores outdoor recreation as a vital aspect of natural resources and land management. Concepts discussed include multiple use management, recreational enterprises, state and federal outdoor recreation agencies, environmental education, and current topics in outdoor recreation. Lab required.

    Wildlife Management

    • NATR 252
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Introduces the principles of wildlife management and some of the practices and techniques used in controlling wild animal populations. Emphasizes the multiple use concept necessary for natural resource management.

    Natural Resource Coop Wk Exp

    • NATR 280
    • 1.00 Credit

    Quarters Offered: Summer, Winter

    Designed to give students an opportunity to acquire actual work experience in their chosen field. An on-site supervisor will supervise and evaluate the work experience student. Instructor approval of work setting and placement is required. For each credit earned, the student will need to document 36 hours at the work site.

    Natural Resource Field Studies Camp

    • NATR 290 (P/T)
    • 1.00 Credit

    Quarters Offered: Summer

    Introduces students to field work within the Natural Resource discipline. Emphasizes critical thinking in the field, remote working conditions, and teamwork approaches to problem solving. May require multiple days in the field with the potential for adverse weather conditions.

    NRS: Nursing

    Foundations Of Nursing-Health Promo

    • NRS 110 (P/T)
    • 9.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Introduces the learner to framework of the OCNE curriculum. The emphasis on health promotion across the life span includes learning about self-health as well as patient health practices. To support self and patient health practices, students learn to access research evidence about healthy lifestyle patterns and risk factors for disease/illness, apply growth and development theory, interview patients in a culturally sensitive manner, work as members of a multidisciplinary team giving and receiving feedback about performance, and use reflective thinking about their practice as nursing students. Populations studied in the course include children, adults, older adults and the family experiencing a normal pregnancy. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. The clinical portion of the course includes practice with therapeutic communication skills and selected core nursing skills identified in the OCNE Core Nursing Skills document. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program.

    Found Of Nursing: Chronic Illness I

    • NRS 111 (P/T)
    • 6.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    Introduces assessment and common interventions (including technical procedures) for patients with chronic illnesses common across the life span in multiple ethnic groups. The patient's and family's "lived experience" of the condition is explored. Clinical practice guidelines and research evidence are used to guide clinical judgments in care of individuals with chronic conditions. Multidisciplinary team roles and responsibilities are explored in the context of delivering safe, high quality health care to individuals with chronic conditions (includes practical and legal aspects of delegation). Cultural, ethical, legal and health care delivery issues are explored through case scenarios and clinical practice. Case exemplars include children with asthma, adolescents with a mood disorder, adults with Type 2 Diabetes, and older adults with dementia. The course includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisites: NRS 110

    Found Of Nursing: Acute Care I

    • NRS 112 (P/T)
    • 6.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Introduces the learner to assessment and common interventions (including relevant technical procedures) for care of patients across the life span who require acute care, including normal childbirth. Disease/illness trajectories and their translation into clinical practice guidelines and/or standard procedures are considered in relation to their impact on providing culturally sensitive, client-centered care. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisites: NRS 110

    Nursing In Chronic Illness II

    • NRS 221 (P/T)
    • 9.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter

    This course builds on foundations of nursing in Chronic Illness I. Chronic Illness II expands the student's knowledge related to family care giving, symptom management, and end of life concepts. These concepts are a major focus and basis for nursing interventions with patients and families. Ethical issues related to advocacy, self-determination, and autonomy are explored. Complex skills associated with the assessment and management of concurrent illnesses and conditions are developed within the context of patient and family preferences and needs. Skills related to enhancing communication and collaboration as a member of an inter-professional team and across health care settings are further explored. Exemplars include patients with chronic mental illness and addictions as well as other chronic conditions and disabilities affecting functional status and family relationships. Prerequisites: Completion of First Year of Nursing Curriculum: NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 112, NRS 230, 231, 232, 233

    Nursing In Acute Care II and End-

    • NRS 222 (P/T)
    • 9.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall

    Course builds on Nursing in Acute Care I, focusing on more complex and/or unstable patient care conditions, some of which may result in death. These patient care conditions require strong noticing and rapid decision making skills. Evidence base is used to support appropriate focused assessments, and effective, efficient nursing interventions. Life span and developmental factors, cultural variables, and legal aspects of care frame the ethical decision-making employed in patient choices for treatment or palliative care for disorders with an acute trajectory. Case scenarios incorporate prioritizing care needs, delegation and supervision, and family and patient teaching for either discharge planning or end-of-life care. Exemplars include acute conditions affecting multiple body systems. Prerequisites: Completion of First year of Nursing Curriculum: NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 112, NRS 230, 231, 232, and 233

    Integrative Practicum I

    • NRS 224 (P/T)
    • 9.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Course is designed to formalize the clinical judgments, knowledge and skills necessary in safe, registered nurse practice. Faculty/Clinical Teaching Associates/Student Triad Model provides a context that allows the student to experience the nursing role in a selected setting, balancing demands of professional nursing and lifelong learning. Analysis and reflection throughout the clinical experience provide the student with evaluate criteria against which they can judge their own performance and develop a practice framework. Prerequisites: NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 112, HRS 230, 231, 232, NRS 221 and NRS 222

    Clinical Pharmacology I

    • NRS 230 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Course introduces the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. It includes the foundational concepts of principles of pharmacology, nonopioid analgesics, and antibiotics, as well as additional classes of drugs. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of information, understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, developmental physiologic considerations, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. Drugs are studied by therapeutic or pharmacological class using an organized framework. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology Sequence, and Microbiology

    Clinical Pharmacology II

    • NRS 231 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Spring

    Sequel to Clinical Pharmacology I continues to provide the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective nursing care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of information, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. The course addresses additional classes of drugs and related natural products not contained in Clinical Pharmacology I. Prerequisites: NRS 230

    Pathophysiological Processes I

    • NRS 232 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Fall, Winter

    Course introduces pathophysiological processes that contribute to many different disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. It includes foundational concepts of cellular adaptation, injury, and death; inflammation and tissue healing; fluid and electrolyte imbalances; and physiologic response to stressors and pain, as well as additional pathophysiological processes. Students will learn to make selective clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused nursing assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology Sequence, and Microbiology

    Pathophysiological Processes II

    • NRS 233 (P/T)
    • 3.00 Credits

    Quarters Offered: Winter, Spring

    Sequel to Pathophysiological Processes I continues to explore pathophysiological processes that contribute to disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused nursing assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes. The course addresses additional pathophysiological processes not contained in Pathophysiological Processes I. Prerequisites: NRS 111, NRS 230

    Medication Assistant

    • NURS 090 8 (P/T)
    • 0.00 Credit

    Quarters Offered: Offered as needed

    This course leads to eligibility for certification as a Medication Assistant in the state of Oregon, and meets all Oregon State Board of Nursing requirements. Upon completion of the course students will be able to safely, legally, and accurately administer and document medications to clients in appropriate healthcare settings. This course follows the approved OSBN curriculum requirements for Certified Medication Aide in Oregon. Prerequisites: Current Oregon or Idaho Certified Nursing Assistant I certification, 6 months documented full time Certified Nurses Aide I work experience (or equivalent part time experience), criminal background check).

    Helpful Contacts

    • Advising: 541.881.5815
    • Admissions: 541.881.5811
    • Financial Aid: 541.881.5833
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